Birch Trees Table Runner

Paintstik & Stencil Birch Trees

We can always use a little inspiration in our lives. Karen Nickelson just sent me photos of the Birch Trees Table Runner that she created using Paintstiks and the Aspen Tree Stencil. Karen started with White Cotton Fabric, so the Trees would be White. Then used the 12 x 12 inch Aspen Tree Stencil, Brushes, Matte Purple Sage, Payne’s Gray, Iridescent Charcoal, Brown and Pearl White for her creation.

Aspen Tree Stencil showing part one.

Painter’s Tape and Sticky Note Update

The Background was painted in as shown above. Don’t worry if you get paint in the highlights of the Birch Trees. If you look at the two photos below, pretend that the background is painted. Painter’s Tape has been run down the side of the tree, you can now us the Payne’s Gray or Black to paint in the highlights the tape will keep you from getting over-spray on the background. I also use Sticky Notes to help keep my hand from smearing the background while I am doing the highlights. Sticky Notes also help to mask off around those little tiny spots on the branches.

Building the Birch Tree Grove

Karen decided that she did not want to do individual 12 x 12 squares and then sew the squares together. Instead she made the trees appear to be a large grove of Birch Trees. Painters tape and sticky notes became her new best friend.

Aspen Tree Stencil showing two parts

How to Quilt the Birch Tree Table Runner?

It is always fun when I get to consult on a project. I know that sometimes I just need a second set of eyes to take a look. I received a couple of photos that said “1/4 pop of color Brown or Purple?”. The Purple strip just made it sing.

Birch Tree Table Runner Ready for Quilting.

Finished Birch Tree Table Runner

Machine quilted just enough to give it depth and texture to the Table Runner. I love how the background color goes from Light at the bottom (foreground) to dark for the deep background. You can really see all of the branch details.

Completed Birch Tree Table Runner

Close Up

I always like to include a close up photo, that way you can see the details easier. A fair amount of blending going on, so the the color change is gradual seamless. Painters Tape was placed up the side of the tree so the Payne’s Gray detail could be added, using the smallest Stencil Brush. I love how the same stencil can be used and look entirely different. Four Seasons Example. You can fond all of the supplies at Marbled Arts

Details of Birch Tree Table Runner.

What is Hand Marbled Fabric?

Marbling is an ancient offset printing process. Simply put, Paint floats on a thickened liquid base. The design is created using a variety of rakes and combs.  The paint will transferred onto the fabric when it is gently placed on to of the marbling base.

How do I make Marbled Fabric?

I start with 100% Cotton PFD (Prepared for Dying) Fabric.  I first Hand Dye the fabric to get the color I selected to create.  My Hand Dyed Fabric is cut to the desired size for marbling, soaked in an alum solution and allowed to air dry.

A thin layer of paint is floated on the marbling base.  I like to use a selection of six different colors. I find myself fiddling with the color combination until my heart sings.

A variety of Rakes and Combs are used to create the design.  I currently create four designs Waved Icarus, Dragonwing, Freestyle and Stones.  The Hand Dyed Fabric is gently lowered onto the floated paint and then carefully removed. 

It is gently rinsed in cold water and allowed to hang dry.   

Once Dry the Marbled Fabric is left to cure for fourteen days.  Then Washed, dried, ironed and is ready to use in your latest creation.

You can always find my Hand Marbled Fabric on my website www.marbled-arts.com

How long does it take to make Marbled Fabric?

Starting with PFD Fabric to luscious Hand Marbled Fabric, the entire process takes a minimum of eighteen days.

Do I need to pre-wash fabrics from Marbled Arts?

Our dying process guarantees that your fabric is pre-shrunk and washable.  We always recommend that you rinse any fabric in warm water until it runs clear, before you include it in a project.  Why take chances?

How do I care for my Marbled Arts Fabric?

We Recommend cold water, gentle, delicate or hand wash cycle using non-detergent soap (Synthrapol, Dr. Bronner’s or Orvis Past Soap).  Our fabrics may be dried in your home dryer on a medium setting and then ironed on the cotton setting.

Bristol Bay Face Gaiter

Creating Bristol Bay Face Gaiter

You may not know that my husband is a Commercial Fisher in Bristol Bay Alaska. The need arose for an easy on, easy off Face Covering that was even easier to keep track of. We started throwing around some ideas, drawing pictures and I started sewing. Must Not have strings (ties) attached in the truest sense. Our solution was creating the Bristol Bay Face Gaiter. We hope to keep all of our favorite Fisher Folk safe.

First version of Bristol Bay Face Gaiter

Why not a regular Face Mask?

When working around equipment that moves, safety is key. That means no ties, that could potentially get caught in the moving parts. When not covering your face the Face Mask cannot be able to fly away or drop into the fish hold. Don’t want to have to spend time chasing it or looking for it. Thus the Bristol Bay Neck Gaiter was created.

Male wearing Bristol Bay Face Gairer

Features

Tightly woven 100% Cotton Batik Fabric, Two Layers. One layer of Sheer Weight Interfacing. Very easy on/up and off/down. Placing the Face Gaiter under your ears provides a tighter fit around your nose.

Face Gaiter in the down/off position.

For all of those Wookies with lots of hair, we have you covered. Lots of room for all that hair. Pull it up when you pull up to a tender, deliver fish, depart pull it down and get to work.

Back view

If you look closely I have place a large paper clip on the elastic so it can be tightened up if you want a snugger fit. Everything has been preshrunk. Much easier to tighten and make smaller, then to make larger.

side view

The over all size of opening on these are 24 inches. I can easily make them larger or smaller.

Finished product

You can contact me directly or find the Bristol Bay Face Gaiter at my Etsy Shop.

Mad Mad Mask Making Maven

Mad Mad Mask Making Maven

On March 6, 2020 my first Quilt Show was canceled and with it about 99.9% of my income. Don’t get me wrong I totally support the decision to close WA State down to flatten the curve and save lives. But as a self-employed person 99.9% is a huge hit. So I started making Face Masks. I could not find a pattern that I really loved. That lead to designing my own. My family now refers to me as the Mad Mad Mask Making Maven.

Side View of Women wearing Face Mask.
Front view of Women Wearing Face Mask

Etsy.com Here We Come

I have always wanted to try selling on Etsy.com. It is a totally different market than selling at Quilt Shows & Sew Expo. It all started with adding my Hand Dyed Bamboo Socks to Etsy. Etsy has recently changed some it’s policies, so finding the current info was a challenge. I made several Face Masks and gave it a try.

Side View of Man wearing Face Mask.
Front View of Man Wearing Face Mask.

Success For the Mad Mad Mask Making Maven

I am happy to say I have actually sold quite a number of my Face Masks. My motto has always been “When Life Gives you Lemons, Make Lemonade and Carry On”. And if you are interested in purchasing my Face Mask you can find me on Etsy.

Thank You to Bob for being my Model.

I thought I should also add photos from some of the folks that have purchased my Face Masks. Everyone it a little different, so how they wear their Face mask might be a little different.

Male wearing face mask.
male wearing Face mask

Ruby

Ruby or how I used a OverDyed Damask Linen Tablecloth to create a unique Garment for myself.

Ruby is a wonderful Top/Dress pattern buy Rae Hoesktra from Made-by-Rae Sewing Patterns.  Sizes range from XXS to XXXL.  Ruby is a quick and easy garment pattern.  The pattern provides great step by step instructions.  You can find Ruby pattern at Marbled Arts.  Ruby is also the first garment I constructed using my OverDyed Damask Linen Tablecloths.

OverDyed Tablecloth

I have always loved old antique Damask Linen Tablecloths.  I found several with ugly dark stains on them. You may have guessed that anything that is in my studio to long ends up in a dye bucket. I preceded to over dyed several Damask Lined Tablecloths.  In my experiments I have found dark bold colors work best to completely cover the stains.  And that Procion MX Dyed are the best dye for good full over all coverage.

Ruby Garment Front

I will say that it took me longer to figure out how I wanted to Fussy Cut the pattern pieces out than it did to make the entire garment. Often referred to as the Fussy Cut from Hell.

Ruby Garment Back

But I love the Damask Design in the linen and really wanted to show it off to its best advantage. So tying the different ways to Fussy Cut was definitely worth the effort.

Hem Area

I did add 3 inches to the length of the garment as I am tall, but also to add more of the gorgeous Damask Design along the hem line.

Garment Yoke

Love the way my version of Ruby turned out using the OverDyed Damask Linen Tablecloth. In the photo you are able to see that I used Hand Dyed Cotton of the same color to line the yoke.

Harvest Moon

Harvest Moon Pattern sample.

Harvest Moon is the latest Pattern Sample using Marbled Arts Fabric. Every creation starts with finding the right fabric. Hand Marbled Ochre in Dragonwing Design. Hand Dyed Light Gray, Hand Dyed Ochre in two shades and Hand Dyed Ocean Dark.

Finished Harvest Moon

Love the finished project. Ended up hand stitching in the stems using some old yarn that was in my stash. The light stitching was done using embroidery thread. Always enjoy adding texture.

Close Up

Close up of Harvest Moon, so you see the details.

Breezy Sunflowers

Creating Breezy Sunflowers

A couple of Summers ago my neighbor Kat showed up at my door with three Sunflower Plants.  They grew into beautiful Sunflowers, that never failed to make me smile.  I am always on the hunt for patterns that will show off my hand marbled and hand dyed fabrics.  Breezy Sunflower is perfect for that.  It always takes a bit of time to select just the right fabric.  Hand Marbled Sun (two different designs), Hand Marbled Chocolate Freestyle, Hand Dyed Chartreuse and Hand Dyed Forest is what I started with.

Quilting the Sunflowers

As I wanted to show off the Marbled Fabric, I chose to only do very simple quilting.  Found an Art Deco book in my library, clean simple lines was what I was shooting for.

Sunflower Close Up

Marbled Fabric gives the Sunflower motion, depth and life.  It is always satisfying when a creation turns out better than you thought possible.

Create a Wearable Art Garment!

If you are looking to create a Wearable Art Garment this pattern (Kwik Sew K4104) gives you space to play.  The Lined Open Front Jacket is pretty easy to construct.  It took me longer because of all the embellishments and Quilting that were added.  When I plan to Quilt on a garment constructed with Hand Dyed Cotton Fabric, I always use Flannel as batting.  The Flannel has been washed and dried a minimum of three times in very hot water and dried in a hot dryer.  This is done to get any possible shrinkage out of the way. 

Kwik Sew 4104 Open Jacket

First Cutting

Because I planned to Quilt on this garment, I initially cut the fabric out one-inch larger than the pattern pieces.  This allows for any shrinkage that occurs during Quilting and Embellishing. 

Paper pattern showing the extra one inch added.

Accent Designing 

Accent colors are Hand Dyed Lavender, Sky Blue and Marbled Cerulean.  The strips were made using a ¼” Bias Tape Maker.  The Ultimate Marking Pencil (UMP) was used to draw the lines for strip placement.  After sewing down the colored strips, I used a hot iron (Steam or no Steam, works both ways) to remove the UMP lines.  At this point I felt a little stumped, things didn’t look right, my creative eye was not happy.  Thinking it was time to put the project into a Time Out.  My sister suggested that I hang the jacket on my new dress form to see what I thought.  Realized that I had been constructing in 2D and my brain had been dreaming in 3D.  With a few minor adjustments and I was ready to move on. 

Shows the drawn lines and color placement.

Quilting Design


The Ultimate Marking Pencil is used to draw very basic Quilting outlines.  I always allow myself the freedom to create and adjust as I am Quilting.  The beauty of the UMP is if you are not pleased with the design you can iron it away.  I love the face that once I am done Quilting, I can iron away the markings and no one knows that I Quilted outside the lines.

Shows proposed quilting lines drawn with UMP.

Quilting


Quilting takes time, give yourself time to Quilt.  I always use extra pieces of Cotton and Flannel to do a sample to find the right thread, needle, stitch length and tension.  Remember everything is a huge adventurous experiment.

Close up of Tone on Tone Quilting.

Second Cut


My Fabric has been created.  Time to cut out and mark everything.  Construction of the jacket took less time than making the fabric.  The pattern called for tons of Understitching, so I chose to leave an opening in the lower center back of the lining.  It made it easier to get to all of the places to Understitch.  I sew it up by hand when everything was finished.

Paper pattern piece on quilted and embellished fabric.

Finished Wearable Art Jacket

This is View A, but with all of the Embellishments and Quilting I chose to put pockets in the side seams instead if the Welt Pockets.  Jackets need pockets in my world. This is how I Create a Wearable Art Garment.

Front view of finished jacket K4104.
Back of finished jacket.
3/4 view of finished jacket K4104.